Material Science Research at BioSense Institute


Future societal challenges require solutions based on novel materials with multiple functionalities, different tailored forms and properties customized for specific applications and performance requirements.

 

Materials science and engineering lies at the crossroads of science and technology, bridging the gap between fundamental understanding of physics, chemistry and biology, and the technological applications which are realized from the microscale (e.g. semiconductors and nanotechnology) to the macro scale (e.g. engineered materials from aerospace to medical applications).

 

State-of-the-art research at BioSense Institute strives to integrate various material forms so as to advance existing and create new devices and components. This process involves the synthesis and processing of new material configurations, spanning from nanoparticles and nanolayered structures to single-/poly-crystalline and composite structures, as well as the measurement of material properties and their characterization in terms of geometry and process-structure and structure-property correlations.

 

This process involves the synthesis and processing of new material configurations, spanning from nanoparticles and nanolayered structures to single-/poly-crystalline and composite structures, as well as the measurement of material properties and their characterization in terms of geometry and process-structure and structure-property correlations.

 

The diverse expertise of material scientists at BioSense, supported by different characterization methods such as XRPD (X Ray Powder Diffractometer), UV-Vis (Ultraviolet-Visual spectrometer), DSC (Differential Scanning calorimeter,) TGA (Thermogravimetric Analysis), FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrometry), SEM (scanning electron microscope) and AFM (atomic force microscope), are engaged to address some of the crucial challenges of humankind. Besides processing of the materials useful for fabrication of various types of sensor devices (gas sensors, soil moisture sensors, etc.), the underlining goal is to design new materials with distinct properties aimed at specific applications in biosystems.

SEM image of The Beautifull Nanoworld of Ceramics formed by ceramic material nickel manganite, obtained by chemical method and heat treated at 1300 °C.

A special attention in our research is focused on ceramic materials which are vital for various environmental sensors, but also for new devices for energy conversion, storage and harvesting, as well as in drug delivery.